Contact Us

University of Illinois Extension serving Bureau, LaSalle, Marshall and Putnam Counties

Main Office (LaSalle County)
815 North Orlando Smith Road
Room C223
Oglesby, IL 61348
Phone: 815- 224-0889
Email: uie-blmp@illinois.edu
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

Branch Office (Bureau County)
850 Thompson St,
Becker Professional Suites,
Princeton, IL 61356
Phone: 815-875-2878
FAX: 815-875-2870
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

Branch Office (LaSalle County)
1689 North 31st Road,
Suite 2
Ottawa, IL 61350
Phone: 815-433-0707
FAX: 815-433-5454
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

Branch Office (Marshall-Putnam County)
509 Front Street,
Suite 4
Henry, IL 61537
Phone: 309-364-2356
FAX: 309-364-2804
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

News Release

Eggs are Front and Center this week!

Enjoy eggs this week!  Eggs are so versatile; eat them for breakfast, lunch or dinner.  If you are wondering what to make for dinner this week, University of Illinois Extension suggests something made with eggs.  Turn your typical morning recipes into delicious, quick and easy dinners.  Try an omelet with a twist; add feta cheese, spinach, and tomato slices.  How about a delicious quiche with fresh spring asparagus or baked eggs over diced potatoes.  Don’t forget pizza; top a pre-baked pizza crust with scrambled eggs, mushrooms, onion and cheese and bake. 

 

With a little creativity, eggs can be enjoyed in so many ways!  Eggs provide an affordable dose of healthy nutrition.  Research suggests eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function and eye health.  One large egg provides 13 essential vitamins and minerals, six grams of high-quality protein and all nine essential amino acids with only 70 calories.

 

Stay calm; you can do this!  Try some of our University of Illinois Extension Nutrition and Wellness recipes at YouTube, What’s Cooking? with Mary Liz Wright.  Check out food demonstration videos on how to make boiled eggs, scrambled eggs, omelets, and frittatas. 

 

When cooking eggs, follow these simple food safety rules:

 

·         ALWAYS WASH HANDS BEFORE AND AFTER HANDLING EGGS.

·         COOK EGGS MAKING SURE BOTH THE WHITE AND YOLK ARE FIRM.

·         EGGS IN CASSEROLES ARE COOKED WHEN THE TEMPERATURE REACHES A SAFE 160 °F (using a food thermometer).

·         REFRIGERATE HARD-COOKED EGGS WITHIN 2 HOURS OF COOKING, USE WITHIN 7 DAYS.

·         STORE EGGS AT 41 °F IN THE COLDEST PART OF THE REFRIGERATOR, UNFORTUNATELY, THAT IS NOT IN THE DOOR!

·         ALWAYS STORE EGGS IN THE CARTON NEVER REUSE CARTONS.

·         NEVER EAT EGGS THAT HAVE SAT AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FOR LONGER THAN TWO-HOURS.

 

 

 

Note:  Infants, young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to foodborne illnesses. No one should eat foods containing raw eggs.  This includes "health food" milk shakes made with raw eggs, Caesar salad, Hollandaise sauce, and any other foods like homemade mayonnaise, ice cream, or eggnog.  However, in-shell pasteurized eggs can be used safely in recipes that call for raw egg.  Most eggs sold in grocery stores are NOT pasteurized.  Pasteurized eggs are individually stamped or identified on a label adhered to the egg carton.

 

Decorating Eggs:

 

•    After dying eggs, return them back into the refrigerator within 2 hours.

 

•    If blowing out eggshells be aware that some raw eggs may contain salmonella. To destroy bacteria that may be present on the surface of the egg, wash the egg in hot water and then rinse in a solution of 1 teaspoon liquid chlorine bleach per half cup of water.

 

•    For hunting eggs, it is not recommended to use hard-cooked eggs that have been lying on the ground, because they can pick up bacteria, especially if the shells are cracked. If the shells crack, bacteria could contaminate the inside. Eggs should be hidden in places that are protected from dirt, moisture, pets, and other sources of bacteria. The total time for hiding and hunting eggs should not exceed 2 hours. The "found" eggs must be washed, re-refrigerated, and eaten within seven days of cooking.

 

Top Egg Dishes from Around the World:

 

•    Scotch Eggs

•    Basque-Style Baked Eggs Recipe

•    A koori, Indian-style scrambled eggs

•    Kefta, Tomato, and Egg Tagine

•    Baked Eggs With Tomato And Feta

•    Huevos Rancheros

 

Try a quick and easy recipe your family will love for Huevos Rancheros from the Illinois Nutrition Education Program (INEP) recipe website:  Let’s Eat for Health, Illinois at:  https://web.extension.illinois.edu/INEP/recipes.

 

More information on eggs can be found at: Farm to Table, Egg Food Safety, USDA

Local Contact: Susan Glassman, Extension Educator, Nutrition & Wellness, susang@illinois.edu