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Valerie Kehoe
Program Coordinator, Horticulture
University of Illinois Extension
9415 South Western Avenue, Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60643
Phone: 773-233-2900
FAX: 773-233-9183
vkehoe@illinois.edu

Gemini Bhalsod
Extension Educator, Horticulture
University of Illinois Extension
1114 N. Arlington Heights Road
Suite 201
Arlington Heights, IL 60004
Phone: 847-201-4176
FAX: 847-201-4175
gbhalsod@illinois.edu

Susan Gasper
Extension Educator, S.T.E.M.
University of Illinois Extension
9415 South Western Avenue, Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60643
Phone: 773-233-2900
FAX: 773-233-9183
smgasper@illinois.edu

Nancy Kreith
Extension Educator, Horticulture
University of Illinois Extension
4747 Lincoln Mall Drive
Suite 601
Matteson, IL 60443
Phone: 708-679-6889
FAX: 708-679-6855
kreith@illinois.edu

Conservation@Home Program

Conservation@Home Program

Invasive Plant Species

  • Aggressive Plants PDF
    We all want our plants to grow and thrive, but some of them occasionally get carried away. Plants that grow vigorously, overflowing their boundaries and choking out more well-behaved plants, are often referred to as “garden thugs”.

  • Aquatics Early Detection Flyer PDF
    Keep a lookout for new aquatic INVASIVE PLANTS in the Midwest!These species could be spreading in your area. Early detection and eradication can prevent an invasion!

  • Invasive Plants Fact Sheet PDF
    An invasive plant can be a tree, shrub, grass, herb, or fern in water or on land that is not native to a region or country and causes harm to the economy, environment, or human health in areas where it becomes established.

  • New Invasive Species in the Midwest PDF
    These species could be spreading in your area; early detection and eradication can prevent an invasion.

  • Terrestrial Invasive Plants in the Midwest PDF
    Early detection and eradication can prevent an invasion.

  • The Problem of Invasive Species PDF
    Invasive plants out compete and crowd out native plants, especially rare, endangered, or fragile species. They reduce diversity and may create a monoculture. They destroy plants that native pollinators and other animals depend on for survival.

  • Winged Burning Bush Fact Sheet PDF
    Winged burning bush spreads by seed and root stem cuttings. Birds and small mammals will eat its fruits and deposit seeds over long distances. As it grows in dense thickets it displaces native plants and the native animals that depend on those plants are deprived of food and shelter.