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Animals and Science in the Classroom

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Giving thanks for our pets


With the Thanksgiving holiday right around the corner we often prepare our homes for friends and family, begin preparing meals or take off for a much needed vacation. However you spend your holiday, don't forget to plan for your pets and animals that live in the classroom.
  • Make sure that animals are not left in the classroom over the holidays. It is best if one person (preferably the teacher) takes the class pet home and not rotate between homes as this may agitate and cause undue stress to your animal(s).
  • Plan ahead for vacation: make sure you have your pets vaccinations up to date well ahead of time (at least a month). Call boarders and kennels to find out what vaccines are required and how many days prior they should be administered.
  • No matter how much they use those sweet puppy dogs' eyes, it is never a good idea to feed them table food. We're all tempted to throw our dogs (or cats) a bone especially during the Thanksgiving holiday, but bones and other things in turkey & stuffing can cause our pets to have major issues. This can also lead to you having to pay major vet bills! Check the ASPCA website for more information about what not to feed your pets.
  • If you are having Thanksgiving dinner at your home, make sure you inform family and friends early on that they should not feed your pet from the table
  • Some people will have a kids table, which usually sits lower to the ground. Pets are very intelligent and tend to seek easier prey and they may be able to swipe food easily, so be on guard!
  • If traveling with your pet ensure their comfort during the ride.  If driving you can begin early by acclimating them to the car by taking short trips which increase in length until the final trip.  If flying or taking a train with your pet get them used to the crate they will travel in.  If you think sedatives are needed speak to your vet well ahead of time about administration, although in many cases they may be unnecessary.
  • If pet's must be left in the classroom, remember that the temperatures will probably decrease during the time you are away.  Ensure a proper covering for drafty areas and a heat lamp or pad which only covers some of the cage.  Make sure there is plenty of food and water supplied.  If possible come in to check on your classroom pet often and it is not recommended to leave them alone for long periods of time!


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