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Spring Fever, Have you Gotten it Yet?

Posted by Beth Allhands - Gardening

Spring Fever, have you gotten it yet? February's combination of inclement weather, fragrant bouquets around stores for Valentine's Day, and a 70 minute gain of sunlight from the first of the month to the last are major triggers of this malady. Don't suffer in silence. There are ways to combat even the severest of cases.

First, attend nearby garden workshops. On February 25 Macon County Master Gardeners are hosting their annual gardening day event. Check it out at https://web.extension.illinois.edu/registration/?RegistrationID=15755. Check out other presentations and topics while on this web page, also. Brambly berry fruit, growing hydroponics, sustainable landscaping classes are just some of the ways to get immunized against Spring Fever.

To take control to beat February- and for the best offense, pair the above events with starting some seeds indoors or planning what to direct sow outdoors. Here is a nice table about when to plant for hardy and half- hardy frost resistant vegetables; as all are below.

Vegetable

Hardiness

Recommended planting period for central Illinois

Time to grow from seed to field

For overall
Use

For
storage

weeks

Asparagus

Hardy

Mar.15-Apr. 15

.

Broccoli

Half-hardy

Apr. 10-May 1
July 1-15

.

4-6

Cabbage

Half-hardy

Apr. 10-July 15

June 10

4-6

Carrot

Half-hardy

Apr. 10-July 15

May 15

Cauliflower

Half-hardy

July 10-20

.

4-6

Chard

Half-hardy

Apr.10-June 1

.

Garlic (spring planted)

Hardy

Mar. 25-Apr. 15

Apr. 1-10

Garlic (fall planted)

Hardy

Sept-Oct

Kale

Hardy

Apr. 1-30
July 1-Aug.1

July 10

Kohlrabi

Hardy

Mar. 25-Apr. 5
Aug. 1-10

Aug. 1

Lettuce, leaf

Half-hardy

Mar. 25-May 15
Aug. 15-Sept. 15

.

Mustard

Half-hardy

Apr. 1-May 10
Aug.15-Sept. 15

.

Onion, from seed

Hardy

Mar. 25-Apr. 15

Apr. 1

Onion, from plants or sets

Hardy

Mar. 25-May 1

Apr. 1

Parsley

Half-hardy

Apr. 10-May 1

.

Peas

Half-hardy

Apr. 10-May 1

.

Potato

Half-hardy

Apr. 1-15
June 1-10

June 1

Radish, spring

Half-hardy

Apr. 5.-June 1
Aug. 20-30

.

Radish, winter

Half-hardy

Aug. 1-15

Aug. 10

Rhubarb

Hardy

Mar. 25-May 15

.

Spinach

Hardy

Mar. 25-Apr. 15
Aug. 15-30

.

Turnips

Hardy

Mar. 25-Apr. 15
Aug. 1-15

Aug. 1


Hardy vegetables can be planted as soon as the ground can be prepared. Half-hardy vegetables can be planted as early as 2 to 3 weeks before the average date of the last 32 freeze in the spring

As you can see, Broccoli, Cabbage and Cauliflower are well suited to start from seed indoors 4 to 6 weeks before average frost date. In central Illinois, zone 5, the average last frost is April 15. This does not mean it is a frost-free date. There is a 50 percent chance of frost after this date.

Our official frost free date is May 15; or as some people find easy to remember; Mother's Day.

If you weren't planning on growing vegetables this year; what about flowers? Many annual flowers are super easy to grow from seed; and the benefits include cost savings and often a wider variety of available choices from standard mass marketing. Lastly, there are almost always great deals on house plants starting in March at your local nursery or even home improvement centers, (hey, makes sense, houseplants do improve your home environment). The point is, think green and plan to grow something; you'll be glad you did.

Table excerpted from Illinois Vegetable Growing Guide https://web.extension.illinois.edu/vegguide/step06.cfm



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