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No-Cut Veggies

Posted by Caitlin Huth - Nutrition

I enjoy meal prep with minimal equipment. It means fewer dishes to wash, and many times, less time getting from cooking to eating. In this post, let's explore some different vegetables that do not require a knife to prepare. If I missed some of your favorite no-cut veggies, let me know in the comments.

1. Pour from the bag. In a store, these veggies are often pre-bagged for purchase. Wash with clean water before eating raw or cooking. Mini bell peppers have few seeds, and can be eaten in a couple bits. If your bagged radishes are very large, they may need some cutting.

Try:

  • Baby carrots
  • Snap and snow peas
  • Mini bell peppers
  • Radishes

2. Prep by-hand. Some veggies just need your hands to prepare. Bend asparagus until the top snaps off. The rule-of-thumb is that wherever it breaks separates the tender top from the tough, woody bottom. For lettuce, tear leaves with clean hands.

Try:

  • Asparagus
  • Heads of lettuce

3. Grab from the produce bin. Grape and cherry tomatoes just need a wash before eating and are a popular staple for veggie trays. Have you noticed baby potatoes in your local stores? These small, bite-sized potatoes can be cut, but work well cooked just as they are. If your store does Brussel sprouts in bulk bins, these too can be cooked whole.

Try:

  • Grape and cherry tomatoes
  • Baby potatoes
  • Brussel sprouts

4. Eat from the center and frozen aisles.

From the center and frozen aisles, pick up canned and frozen vegetables. As these produce are packed soon after harvest, they are a good source of many vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. If available, buy reduced-sodium or no-salt-added brands.

With vegetable chips, many brands are exploring dried beet, parsnip, and kale chips, among other veggies. Look at the ingredient list to ensure you are getting those veggies, rather than a blend with just a flavoring of those veggies.

Try:

  • Canned and frozen vegetables
  • Dried vegetable chips

Today's post was written by Caitlin Huth. Caitlin Huth, MS, RD, is a registered dietitian and Nutrition & Wellness Educator serving DeWitt, Macon, and Piatt Counties. She teaches nutrition- and food-based lessons around heart health, food safety, diabetes, and others. In all classes, she encourages trying new foods, gaining confidence in healthy eating, and getting back into our kitchens.



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