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Lifestyle Choices for Wellness

Timely discussion on topics of health and wellness to encourage action and improvement in personal wellness.
2014-08-20 14 44 13

That's Just Peachy!


Each year, the summer season signals the arrival of juicy, sweet peaches. In the United States, most peaches are grown in California, Georgia, and South Carolina. Unfortunately, our cold temperatures in Illinois are not typically suited for abundantly growing this wonderful fruit tree.

 

There are three general types of peaches:

  • Clingstone—Flesh clings tightly to the pit. The early season fruit is generally clingstone and is best used for cooking and canning.
  • Freestone—Flesh readily separates from the pit. These are good for eating fresh, as desserts, and for cooking and freezing.
  • Semi-freestone—Flesh is a little harder to separate from the pit. These are also good for eating fresh, as desserts, and for cooking and freezing.

Peach Nutrition Facts

  • Good source of vitamin A, which promotes good vision, especially in low light. It also helps maintain healthy skin, bones, and teeth.
  • Excellent source of vitamin C, which promotes healing and helps the body absorb iron.
  • A medium (2.66-inch diameter) peach provides 59 calories, 2 grams fiber and is naturally fat-free, sodium-free and cholesterol-free.

When Buying Peaches

  • Choose peaches with a strong, sweet smell.
  • Look for skins that show a background color of yellow or warm cream. Avoid fruit with green around the stem (they aren't fully ripe) or that have shriveled skin (they're old). A red blush is not a reliable indicator of ripeness.

When Storing Peaches

  • Keep them on a counter at room temperature until they are the ripeness you prefer.
  • When ripe, move the peaches to the crisper bin of your refrigerator.

When Cooking with Peaches

  • If a recipe calls for peeled peaches, dip peaches into boiling water for about 30 seconds, then plunge them immediately into ice water. The skins will slip right off.
  • If peeling or cutting up peaches for a recipe, keep them from turning brown by sprinkling with lemon or orange juice.
  • If you have more peaches on hand than you can eat or bake up right away, consider freezing, canning, or making extra into a fruit spread.

Don't know how to preserve your own food? We can help-click here!

While they are fresh, try his peachy recipe out!

 

Just Peachy Frozen Yogurt

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 cups coarsely chopped frozen peaches (about 16 ounces)
  • 1/2 cup sugar, preferably superfine
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Preparation

  1. Combine peaches and sugar in a food processor; pulse until coarsely chopped. Combine yogurt and lemon juice in a measuring cup; with the machine on, gradually pour the mixture through the feed tube. Process until smooth and creamy, scraping down the sides once or twice. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Facts per 1/2 c serving: Calories 110, Total Fat 0g, Saturated/Trans Fat 0g, Sodium 10mg, Cholesterol 0g, Carbohydrate 29g, Protein 2g



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