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Fruit & Vegetable Weekly Crop Update

Timely vegetable crop info for local producers.
corn earworm tomato fruitworm

weekly fruit and vegetable crop update 5-28-2013

Posted by Kyle Cecil -

1.4 inch soil temp: 62.2 F

2.Growing degree days since April 1: 441.0 GDD: Average = 364.0 GDD

3."Our trap at Urbana captured a few corn ear worm moths last weekend. Obviously it's not time to worry about this insect's impact on sweet corn yet, but for the growers with high-tunnel tomatoes that are already setting fruit, the moths do enter tunnels and lay eggs on leaves and developing fruit. We often call it tomato fruit worm when it feeds on tomatoes, but it's the same species. Check the 2013 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for insecticides recommended for its control." (Dr. Rick Weinzierl, U of I).

4.Use degree day information to your advantage. Insect development can be predicted by knowing how long an organism was held at any temperature between temperature thresholds. Another way of saying this is that the amount of heat units required to complete development is constant – a finding that is the basis for prediction models using degree day information. Copy and paste this url to help with predictions of insect activity based on your local conditions.

http://www.isws.illinois.edu/warm/pestdata/sqlchoose1.asp?plc=

5.New to growing basil? Basil and other herbs are becoming commonplace in local grower's fields. Consumer awareness and demand are increasing. Growing basil commercially is somewhat different than the regular backyard production. Here are some tips; grow transplants for early growth, trim the tops of the plants above the first or second set of true leaves. This will encourage branching, harvest multiple leaves or nodes and not the entire plant if possible.

Other:

The Illinois State Horticultural Society

Horticulture Field Day

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Curtis Orchard and Pumpkin Patch (Champaign)

University of Illinois Fruit Research and Education Center (Urbana)



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