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John Fulton


John Fulton
Former County Extension Director



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In The Backyard

Horticulture columns and tips done on a timely basis

Fall Clean Up Time

Posted by John Fulton -

Fall is definitely upon us, and we know the season coming next! While the weather is somewhat cooperative, it is time to take care of some of those final outside chores. At least you'll feel prepared when the weather turns cold, and the main gardening activity is planning for next year. Leaves have been one of the main clean-up items this past week. They will continue to be...

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Fall and Winter Rose Care

Posted by John Fulton -

With scattered frost and cooler temperatures behind us, many are beginning to look at preparing for the winter, and roses are one plant which needs special preparation. Many of the roses that are classified as old garden roses are extremely tolerant of cold temperatures, while others like hybrid teas experience considerable damage. Also, budded roses stand a greater chance of injury or death du...

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Millipede

Millipedes

Posted by John Fulton -

The last week has found the lowly millipede taking homes by storm. If millipedes were insects, they would deserve insect of the week honors. Since they are not insects, we'll just dub them "pest of the week." What are millipedes? They belong to the arthropod class Diplododa, which means double footed. The reason is simple: they have two legs per body segment. There are over...

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Fall Tree Planting

Posted by John Fulton -

Fall isn't a bad time to plant trees; however, the rule is "the earlier – the better." Many sales occur in the fall, and it is a good time to buy. Planting at the earliest possible time will allow for roots to recover from injury in the case of dug trees, or to grow in the case of container stock. Where soil amendments and fertilizer are needed, it is best to add and incorporate before pl...

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Rust in Lawns

Posted by John Fulton -

This past week, rust has paid us a return visit. As grass growth slows, rust is one of the lawn fungi we are dealing with. Rust appears as an orange or yellowish-orange powder (spores) on grass leaf blades, especially in late summer to early fall when the weather is dry. Rust typically develops on lawns growing very slowly. Overall, the turf may assume a yellow, red, or brown appearance. Close...

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Fall Care of Peonies

Posted by John Fulton -

Peonies are one of those "plant it and forget it" flowers. Many haven't been bothered for over 50 years, and are still going strong. As with most plants, crowding can occur, and the time to dig and divide is late September through October. Peonies do best in soils with a slightly acid to neutral pH. The best time to add lime, if needed, is when you dig the plants and replant them. Amend the soi...

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Pruning Raspberries

Posted by John Fulton -

To start with, remove all the dead, short, and weak canes. The large remaining canes are thinned to 4 to 8 inches apart. The canes are cut back to 5-6 feet tall or if no support is provided 3 to 4 feet tall. The canes that produced last year should be removed anytime after harvest, or removed in the late fall. Canes are productive only one year and the new growth will produce the next year's ha...

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Frost

Posted by John Fulton -

If you are ready to have the season conclude, harvest what you can. A freeze is worse than a light frost, as damage may actually occur to thin-fleshed crops such as tomatoes. The main things to harvest prior to a frost or freeze include squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, melons, tomatoes, etc. Virtually everything in the garden will be affected except for frost tolerant crops such as lett...

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sootyblotch of apple

Sooty Blotch of Apple

Posted by John Fulton -

Sooty blotch and flyspeck are caused by different fungi that commonly occur together on the same fruit. The sooty blotch fungus causes surface discoloration with black spots or blotches which can be a fourth of an inch or larger. These spots may run together, making the apple appear to be covered with something like charcoal dust. This disease is more superficial than anything, since it is only...

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Moles and Grubs

Posted by John Fulton -

The number of problems from moles seems to be greatly increasing. This means the food sources are abundant. The major food sources for moles are grubs and earthworms. With the large increases in grubs in some areas due to the Japanese beetle larvae, there may be plenty of food available. The exact number of grubs necessary to cause damage to turf is dependent on the type of grass, t...

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