Contact Us

University of Illinois Extension serving Madison, Monroe and St. Clair Counties

Monroe County
901 Illinois Avenue
PO Box 117
Waterloo, IL 62298
Phone: 618-939-3434
FAX: 618-939-7708
Email: uie-mms@illinois.edu
Hours: Monday - Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

Madison County
1 Regency Plaza
Suite 200
Collinsville, IL 62234
Phone: 618-344-4230
FAX: 618-344-5602
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm - Closed 12 Noon to 1:00

EFNEP Training Center
1269 North 89th Street
Suite 3
East St. Louis, IL 62203
Phone: 618-397-4973
FAX: 618-397-8823
Hours: Monday - Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm (Closed 12 - 1pm)

East St. Louis Library Office
5300 State St.
East St. Louis, IL 62203

Scott Air Force Base Youth Center
4691 Patriots Drive
Scott Air Force Base, IL 62225
Phone: 618-256-4991
Hours: This office is only for Military 4-H Youth Programming

News Release

What To Do With All the Leaves

The fall foliage show of reds, yellows, and golds will be beginning shortly in many parts of Illinois, and will be finishing up before we know it. That one good freeze up north will take care of any more fall color as the leaves come down, left in the landscape and on the lawn.  

 If you are out in the country with natural woodlands, leaves play a part in preserving the natural habitat of native trees, shrubs, and flowers. If that is the case, just let those leaves lie. The leaves will decompose and return valuable nutrients to the soil to be used by soil microbes that support plant growth, says Richard Hentschel, University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator.  

 Where your lawn and trees exist together, mulching the leaves with a mower lets the small pieces fall between grass blades, benefiting the soil, trees, and lawn. But at some point, there can be more leaves than can be mulched in. This is the time to mow and bag them so the leaves do not smother the lawn.  

 Where the vegetable garden is adjacent to the lawn, consider either mowing or blowing the leaves in to the beds to be worked in either this fall or left as a mulch layer for the soil and worked into the soil next spring. Whole leaves can be used as mulch around the base of tender plants like roses. Using the whole leaf means the mulch will not pack down, defeating the purpose of protecting the crown of the rose plant.  

 Now, back to the leaves you have collected with the lawn mower. Consider using them to start a compost pile or build upon one you already have. That mower bag contains the two primary ingredients: browns and greens. When considering where to place the compost pile or bins, think about the shady areas in the yard where the grass does not do well anyway. The traditional compost pile will need to be four to five feet square at the base, with a height of about four feet. “As you create the compost pile, some garden soil should be added in as you go to provide microbes that will be breaking down the organic matter into compost,” Hentschel explains. 

 Since organic matter is naturally acidic, about half a pound of a finely ground limestone should also be added for every cubic yard of material. Now your compost recipe is almost complete. Once the pile has been created, the final ingredient needed is water. If the pile remains too dry, no breakdown occurs. If left too wet, anaerobic conditions and decay will occur, giving you a very smelly, slimy mess to deal with.  

 Fresh kitchen produce peelings can also be added into the compost pile year-round. They provide some of the moisture that is important during the summer and after they have been frozen and thawed from the winter month’s additions, they provide moisture again. If you are lacking in the fallen leaves department, just ask the neighbors who have bags sitting out at the curb.

 “Don’t let that good organic matter get away! Build a compost pile,” Hentschel says.

Source: Richard Hentschel, Extension Educator, Horticulture, hentsche@illinois.edu