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Angie Peltier


Angie Peltier
Former Extension Educator, Commercial Agriculture



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Hill and Furrow

Current topics about crop production in Western Illinois, including field crops research at the NWIARDC in Monmouth.
Disease
Figure. Small black specks (pycnidia) can help in diagnosing Diplodia ear mold.
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Scouting shouldn't end until after harvest

Scouting is a season-long commitment, beginning before planting (measuring soil temperature and assessing condition), continues after planting (assessing plant stands and then scouting for disease, insect and weed pressure) only ending after the crop has been harvested. Late season scouting of corn can include monitoring kernels for maturity (black layer) and moisture content and checki...

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Figure. Symptoms of Physoderma brown spot typically occur in bands.

Making informed foliar fungicide decisions = scout before tasseling time

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

Foliar fungicides in corn - a historical perspective. From the early 1970's through the mid-2000's, when prices averaged close to $2 per bushel and corn was considered a lower value crop, producers worked to minimize all but the most essential inputs. Between 2010 and 2012, when corn prices reached historic highs, producers may have considered additional inputs. While many prod...

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Center Field Day - July 26, 8 AM

Join personnel from the Northwestern Illinois Ag Research and Demonstration Center for their 36th annual field day on July 26. Buses will leave the research center (321 201th Ave, Monmouth) at 8 AM sharp and travel to different stops where researchers will discuss their research at the center. Presentati...

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Figure. Foliar symptoms of bacterial leaf streak showing long lesions with wavy margins and halo visible with backlighting.  Photo courtesy of Scott Schirmer Illinois Department of Agriculture, State Plant Regulatory Official.

Keep an eye out for bacterial leaf streak in corn

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

Last growing season (2016) a new corn disease called bacterial leaf streak (BLS) was confirmed in Illinois for the first time in DeKalb County. Symptoms of BLS include narrow yellow, tan, brown or orange lesions with wavy margins that occur between and along leaf veins (Figure). While symptoms of this disease were observed in Nebraska as early as 2014, it took scientists several years t...

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Grain bins

Temperature fluctuations outside can lead to temperature and moisture issues in stored grain

It is widely understood that the quality of grain coming out of storage is never going to be better than the quality of that grain going into storage. For some that stored 2016 corn, Diplodia and other ear molds ensured that grain quality going into storage was not of ideal quality. Fluctuating air temperatures this winter and spring has the potential to cause moisture or hot-spots to develop in s...

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Figure. Symptoms of sudden death syndrome (SDS) beginning to appear in Western Illinois soybeans. Yellowing and browning of the tissue between leaf veins is one symptom that can help in diagnosis.

Results from 2016 SDS cover crop x seed treatment trial available

One commonality among people is that topics of curiosity are often shared with others. Sometimes these anecdotes can reveal topics that are in need of further study. The 2015 growing season was one that favored sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean, which tended to be quite severe in some areas of western Illinois. One anecdote was passed along to me by Mr. Mike Roegge, a now retired...

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Extension Bi-State Crops Conferences in and near Western Illinois

New and longer-term partnerships between personnel in Illinois and personnel in Missouri and Iowa have resulted in several bi-state crops conferences to be held during January 2017 in Western Illinois or Eastern Iowa. Friday, January 6, 2017: Bi-State Crop Advantage Conference, Burlington, IA, 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM...

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Figure. Aerial picture of the USB-sponsored Commercial SDS Variety Trial at the Northwestern Illinois Ag R&D Center in Monmouth in 2016. The difference in variety maturity is evident in this picture. Moving left to right are varieties in Early MG II, Late MG II, Early MG III and Late MG III. Many varieties in the Early II MGs are mature, many of those in the Late II MGs are nearing maturity, while those in MG III are not as far along.
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2016 SDS Commercial Variety Test Results Available

This past growing season, as part of a United Soybean Board-funded effort, personnel from Southern Illinois University, Iowa State University and University of Illinois evaluated more than 580 soybean varieties from 22 seed companies in sudden death syndrome (SDS) variety trials. The varieties that were evaluated ranged from the very early (MG 0) to late (MG V) maturity groups. Maturity groups...

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Registration now open for the 2017 Regional Crop Management Conferences

Registration is open for the 2017 Crop Management Conferences. These regional conferences provide a forum for discussion and interaction between participants and university researchers and are designed to address a wide array of topics pertinent to crop production in Illinois: crop management, pest management, nutrient management, soil and water management. Certified Crop Advisers can e...

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Figure. Results of a corn planting date trial at the NWIARDC in Monmouth in 2016. Note that planting dates with the same letters are not statistically different.

Results: 2016 Corn planting date x fungicide trial

Each year personnel at the Northwestern Illinois Ag Research & Demonstration Center (NWIARDC) in Monmouth establish a corn planting date trial. In 2016 the same 110-day corn hybrid was planted at the same seeding rate (35,000 seeds/A) and planting depth (1.75 inches) at one of four planting dates in plots 8 rows wide and 100 feet long ( Table ). Each plot was split in half le...

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Figure. Corn harvested at the Northwestern Illinois Ag R&D Center in Monmouth in 2016. Healthy corn is on the left and corn with Diplodia ear mold symptoms and signs is on the right. (Source: Marty Johnson, Senior Research Specialist)

Diplodia ear mold at harvest: What can be done now?

Diplodia Symptoms and Machinery Adjustments at Harvest. Diplodia ear mold can cause lightweight kernels with a dull grey to brownish color and sometimes small black structures call pycnidia ( Figure ). The infected kernels are prone to breakage and can result in poor test weights, poor grain quality and fine materials in the hopper or grain bin. Adjusting combine...

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Figure. Scouting plants for lodging potential is time well spent. For the push test, at waist height push plants 30 degrees from vertical to see if they return to an upright position and the stalk remains intact. To avoid having to harvest downed corn, it is recommended to harvest first those fields in which 10-15% of the plants fail the push test.

Pinch or Push Your Corn: Scouting for Lodging Potential

Stalk rots can reduce yields. Stalk rots can decrease harvestable yield - literally leaving some ears on the ground. Corn plants are top-heavy and stalk rots increase the chance that plants will fall over (lodge) due to a combination of gravity and weather. Conditions that favor stalk rots. Mid-season environmental conditions that favor kernel-set follo...

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Figure. Symptoms associated with lesion mimic mutations are often indistinguishable from pathogen-caused diseases. Frequency of symptomatic plants within a field can help to narrow down a diagnosis.

One of these plants is not like the others…… Context clues and disease diagnosis.

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

A lone symptomatic plant. Nearly every growing year in at least one corn field at the Northwestern Illinois Agricultural R & D Center, a lone plant can be observed exhibiting symptoms that look like those in the photo above ( Figure ). Round-ish, tan spots ranging in size from tiny specks to ½ inch in diameter cover many leaves of the plant. These spots begin...

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Figure. Foliar symptoms of bacterial leaf streak showing long lesions with wavy margins and halo visible with backlighting.  Photo courtesy of Scott Schirmer Illinois Department of Agriculture, State Plant Regulatory Official.

Bacterial Leaf Streak: A New Disease in Illinois Corn

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

Corn survey reveals positive sample in DeKalb County. Several weeks ago in cooperation with the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), personnel from University of Illinois Extension, the Illinois Natural History Survey's Coordinated Agricultural Pest Survey and Illinois Department of Agriculture conducted a survey of production corn fields in two-thirds of...

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Grant Program for Farmers and Ranchers Interested in Increasing Sustainability

From soil erosion to compaction to weed management struggles, farmers know best what is may be limiting crop production or long-term sustainability in the fields that they farm. However during this period of razor-thin margins farmers may be unwilling or unable to fit the costs of experimenting with new conservation practices into their balance sheets. If you are a farmer that has an in...

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Figure. Sudden death syndrome symptoms are often found in patches  in the field.
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The first indications of an epidemic year for sudden death syndrome?

A couple of weeks ago during my morning commute to work between Galesburg and Monmouth a patch of soybeans about 20 feet from the highway was yellow enough to be seen while driving more than 55 mph. Last Thursday, I found a spot to park along the side of the highway to try and figure out what may be causing these symptoms. Narrowing down a disease diagnosis. At eye-leve...

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Figure. Bleached or tan colored husk leaves associated with Diplodia ear mold.
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Disease Alert: Diplodia ear mold in 2016

Symptoms and signs of Diplodia ear mold. In the past couple of weeks, symptoms of ear mold have popped up at the Northwestern Illinois Ag R&D Center. While most fields have rows upon rows of healthy-looking husk leaves enveloping plump ears, in some fields individual ears stand out as the husk leaves are a bleached or tan color ( Figure ). Upon peeling back t...

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Figure. Symptoms of Physoderma brown spot typically occur in bands.

Corn Disease Update - Monmouth, July 14

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

What are we seeing in the field? At the Northwestern Illinois Ag Research & Demonstration Center we are beginning to see some of the residual herbicide activity break, with weeds like giant foxtail and morning glory popping up in some fields. We are also seeing quite a bit of Japanese beetle feeding dama...

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Figure. Corn plants injured by wind and hail on June 22, 2016 at the Northwestern Illinois Agricultural R&D Center in Monmouth.
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Foliar Fungicides on Hail Damaged Corn and Soybean: Does it Pay?

After the Wind and Hail: Corn and Soybean Recovery and Yield Potential. The severe weather that rolled through several counties in Western Illinois in the early morning hours of June 22 makes one think long and hard about how wind- and hail-damaged corn and soybean crops might fare and whether there is anything that can be done to help to preserve remaining yield potential (...

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Figure. Herbicide injury symptoms observed in soybean at the NWIARDC in 2016.
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Injury symptoms in soybeans from soil-applied pre-emergence herbicides

Herbicide injury symptoms have been widespread this year at the Northwestern Illinois Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center (NWIARDC) in Monmouth - on corn and now on soybeans. Soybeans were planted on May 12 and May 1...

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Figure. Raised, black ascoma characteristic of tar spot of corn (photo source: Russ Higgins, University of Illinois Extension).
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Corn Disease Update - Tar Spot

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

This article was also submitted to the Illinois AgriNews by Angie Peltier and Russ Higgins, University of Illinois Extension Educators: Last September tar spot, a corn disease that had not been previously found in the continental US, was confirmed in corn samples collected in Indiana and in several northern Illinois counties.This disease occurred late enough in the growing season t...

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Figure. Stripe rust in winter wheat, Madison County, IL, April 20, 2016 (photo credit: Robert Bellm).

Stripe Rust Observed in Madison County Wheat

Retired commercial agriculture Extension educator Robert Bellm observed stripe rust yesterday in several wheat fields in Madison County ( Figure ). Rust pathogens are obligate parasites, meaning that they need a living host in order to survive. Wind and rain systems from further south bring spores to our area. This is why rust sightings in states to the South and in S...

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Figure. Interveinal chlorosis and necrosis are symptoms characteristic of sudden death syndrome of soybean (Angie Peltier).
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Sudden Death Syndrome Update

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) caused significant yield losses in soybeans in west-central Illinois in 2014. SDS was again reported in some west-central Illinois fields in 2015, and also appeared in the earliest (April 15) planted soybeans at the Northwestern IL Ag. R&D Center (NWIARDC). With funding from the United Soybean Board, researchers at Southern Illinois and Iowa State Univers...

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Figure. Physoderma brown spot lesions.
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Postmortem: Corn Diseases in 2015 - Old Nemeses and New Foes

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

Timely planting in April and May was followed by record-setting rains in June. This led to ponded water that remained for long periods of time in some areas. Research has shown that flooded, anaerobic soil conditions can be devastating for young corn plants, resulting in suffocation death after only 3 to 4 days. Flooded soil conditions can also favor water mold pathogens like Pythium. Water mol...

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Figure. Thick, white, moldy fungal growth characteristic of Diplodia ear mold caused by Stenocarpella maydis (photo: Dr. Carl Bradley, University of Kentucky).

Fungicides investigated for Diplodia ear mold management

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

In a September, 2015 Plant Health Progress article entitled, " Timing and Efficacy of Fungicide Applications for Diplodia Ear Rot Management ", Purdue Plant Pathologist, Dr. Kiersten Wise and graduate student Martha Romero Luna, summarize a series of field and lab-based experiments in which they investiga...

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