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Angie Peltier


Angie Peltier
Former Extension Educator, Commercial Agriculture



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Hill and Furrow

Current topics about crop production in Western Illinois, including field crops research at the NWIARDC in Monmouth.
Figure. Final planting date for corn in Illinois (Image: USDA-RMA).
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Prevented Planting and Federal Crop Insurance


The large rain events that occurred throughout western Illinois during May and the beginning of June has left many fields with standing water or saturated soil, leaving many intended corn acres unplanted. For those that purchased federal crop insurance the final date for planting corn was June 5th (Figure).

The United States Department of Agriculture's Risk Management Agency recently addressed (through a May 13th Press Release) the options that those that have an insurable loss due to prevented planting may have.  According to the USDA-RMA these may include:

  • "Plant during the 25 day late planting period. There is a one percent reduction per day of your yield guarantee.
  • Not plant a crop and receive a prevented planting payment.
  • After the late planting period ends, plant the acreage to another crop and receive a reduced prevented planting payment".

There is also an option to plant an approved cover crop on those acres that receive a prevented planting payment, provided these acres are not harvested for grain and meet haying and grazing restrictions.

There are many specific rules with federal crop insurance as to what can and can't be done and when. The best bet is for those that have not yet planted intended corn acres due to the flooding to contact their insurance agent. Insurance agents must also be contacted before a producer plans on replanting a failed crop or planting a different crop.

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, Agricultural Economist with the University of Illinois, recently wrote a farmDocDAILY article entitled "Evaluating Taking Prevented Planting Payments for Corn". This article explores the many different options that farmers with insured acres can take once the final planting date is reached. Dr. Schnitkey also highlights useful FAST tools available on the farmDoc website that can help in decision-making.

Dennis Bowman, University of Illinois Extension Commercial Agriculture Educator, recently wrote an article in The Bulletin about a new mobile app that has been developed to aid in making the decision to replant corn.

The June 15th final soybean planting date will be upon us quickly (Figure). Many of the same options apply once this date has passed with planting prevented in intended, insured soybean acres.


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