University of Illinois Extension

Archives for April 2017

April 27, 2017
Richard Hentschel

Sometimes it is easy to avoid some of our garden pests just by planting the right thing or at the right time. The squash vine borer is a good example. The vine borer prefers certain varieties, so planting other varieties is the easy way to go. Vining types have a better chance to live on after an attack versus bush types. This is because they root along the vine. In addition, growing your own early sweet corn will avoid the corn earworm, which shows up later. Host Richard Hentschel shares these and other tips for avoiding pests.

 
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April 20, 2017
Richard Hentschel

Richard Hentschel, host of Green Side Up, talks about problems with fruit trees not bearing fruit. There are some good reasons why fruit trees will not flower or will not bear fruit, even if they bloomed and produced the first year you planted them. It can take three to five years before flowers return as the tree recovers from transplanting shock. Proper training also will promote fruits sooner. Apples, for example, will need to be cross-pollinated, so even if they flower they may produce no fruit.

 
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April 13, 2017
Richard Hentschel

Host Richard Hentschel notes recent changes in gypsy moth monitoring and treatments for northern Illinois in 2017. A recent news release from the Illinois Department of Agriculture has added Kane, Kendall, Will and LaSalle counties to a gypsy moth quarantine, which already included DuPage, Cook, Lake and McHenry counties. Trap monitoring in 2016 has indicated the need to treat gypsy moth and the quarantine places additional restrictions on commercial horticulture, as well as homeowners. Homeowners are being asked to closely inspect any recreational vehicles that remain in backyards or outdoors before heading off to a location outside of these eight counties. Something to think about with vacation time approaching. The other, and perhaps more urgent, news release is about Boxwood blight. This disease has been upgraded to the nuisance status with more restrictions on the importation of Boxwoods into Illinois.

 
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April 6, 2017

Host Richard Hentschel talks with Russ Higgins, Ag Educator for the University of Illinois. Soil health is becoming much more important more research has been going on in recent years. Keeping micro flora and soil insect populations high is helping keep yields high and nutrient movement slow in the soil profile. No-till has been increasing based on this research. Nutrient load in the farm fields is also very critical for good yields. Farmers balance fertilizer applications when the plants can best utilize them. When the land receives excessive rainfall, a portion of nutrient load can end up in field tiles and potential lost. Over 10 million Dollars has been used to research how to keep that nutrient load in the fields. Cover crops, buffer strips and other perennials crops are very effective in managing this potential loss.

 
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