University of Illinois Extension

Archives for November 2017

November 30, 2017
Richard Hentschel
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Host Richard Hentschel discussed some interesting facts regarding the impacts of our Christmas Tree industry across the country. Christmas trees are very much sustainable and add to the environment in a many ways.

 
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November 22, 2017
Richard Hentschel
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Horticulture Educator Richard Hentschel talks about those late November outdoor gardening activities like the last mowing and leaf cleanup. He gives tips on getting the lawn mower put to bed and the snow blower ready for service. Predictions are for more snow and volatile winter temperatures so being ready is a good thing.

 
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November 16, 2017
Richard Hentschel
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Picking the not so perfect holiday tree may not be so bad. GSU Host Richard Hentschel shares tips for picking the family holiday tree and for handling it. Plus, he shares how to help it last once it is indoors.

 
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November 9, 2017
Richard Hentschel
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U of I Extension's Richard Hentschel discusses two different topics this week: Fireplace safety and Houseplants. The indoor fireplace means following some simple guidelines before enjoying the wood as it burns. Getting the fireplace and chimney inspected and cleaned to avoid chimney fires this season is important. Also, by now, you may be noticing changes to the houseplants you have brought in from outdoors. Signs are clear, like a loss of foliage or a slowdown of growth, and may require a modified watering program. Using the same kind of media and containers can help manage how much and how often you water.

 
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November 2, 2017
Richard Hentschel

Green Side Up's Richard Hentschel covers common storage of root crops right in the garden and places to store hard rind, or winter, squashes in the home until you can prepare them for the family. Carrots and other root crops do just fine if left in the garden and harvested as needed. Winter squashes prefer storage temperatures between 50 and 55 degrees. They do just fine even 10 degrees warmer, but they may not last as long that way. Cooler, they can last for 4 or more months.

 
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