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Healthy Eats and Repeat

Highlighting Food, Recipes, and Ideas for a Healthy Lifestyle
Tomatoes - text

Mustard Seed to Plate


If you missed the ketchup post, it should pair well with this post on mustard.

Mustard is considered an oilseed crop, which the USDA notes as "grains that are also valuable for the oil content they produce." The main seed varieties are yellow (or white), brown (or black), or oriental mustard. Yellow mustard seeds are commonly used in prepared mustards, like the condiment many of us use on sandwiches. Brown and oriental mustard seeds are spicier than yellow mustard seeds and often used to add spice and flavor in cooked dishes.

Nutrition

A single teaspoon of mustard seeds contains around 10 calories, with small amounts of protein, fat, and carbohydrates. That teaspoon also contains small amounts of vitamins and minerals, including folate, phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium.

  • Buy: There are many types of prepared mustards – from yellow to Dijon to hot mustard and more. Your recipe may also use ground mustard or even the seeds. A typical yellow mustard contains mustard seeds, vinegar, salt, and spices like turmeric. Sodium content in a prepared mustard can be high, so take a look at the label before you buy.
  • Price: Price will vary by brand and amount you buy. It will also vary by what you buy: prepared mustard, mustard seeds, or ground mustard.
  • Store: Store seeds and ground mustard at room temperature. Like other spices, once the aroma goes away, the seeds or ground mustard need to be replaced. Prepared mustard is best stored in the refrigerate, and should be used within a year.
  • Prepare: Prepared mustard, seeds, and ground mustard are ready to use out of their container.  Maybe even try making your own prepared mustard at home.
  • Eat: Mustard lends a nice flavor to savory recipes, like the marinated tomato recipe below.

References:

Marinated Tomatoes (Makes 6 (1 cup) servings)

Red wine vinegar pairs nicely with this recipe, but whatever flavored vinegar you have on hand will work too.

6 medium tomatoes, sliced (or 2 pints cherry or grape tomatoes)
1/4 cup fresh cilantro
3 Tbsp vinegar
1/2 Tbsp oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 tsp brown sugar
1/4 tsp mustard
Freshly ground black pepper

1. Wash, core, and slice tomatoes; arrange on serving platter.
2. Sprinkle tomatoes with chopped cilantro, using scissors.
3. Combine remaining ingredients except pepper in small jar and shake well. Pour over tomatoes. Cover and chill a few hours.
4. Season with pepper just before serving.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 60 calories, 2g fat, 15mg sodium, 9g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 2g protein

Source: I on Diabetes, University of Illinois Extension



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