Signup to receive email updates




or follow our RSS feed

follow our RSS feed

Blog Banner

Healthy Eats and Repeat

Highlighting Food, Recipes, and Ideas for a Healthy Lifestyle
Grapefruit

Grab That Grapefruit


Have you noticed?  Winter tends to bring citrus fruits into season! While oranges are everywhere, don't forget about other citrus, including grapefruit.

Nutrition

Half a medium fresh grapefruit contains around 50 calories, 13g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, and vitamins and minerals including vitamin C, folate, potassium, and magnesium. Due to the pigment, red and pink grapefruit have vitamin A, while white grapefruit will have very little. Grapefruit is not a significant source of fat, protein, or sodium.

  • Buy:
  • Fresh: Look for fresh grapefruit that is firm to the touch without soft spots or discolored skin. Choose fruit that feels heavy.  Between red, pink, and white grapefruits, you might find a slight flavor difference.  Buy what you enjoy - and will eat!
  • Juiced: Buy 100% grapefruit juice, rather than juice cocktails or juice drinks with only some grapefruit juice.
  • Canned: Choose canned grapefruit or fruit cups in 100% juice or light syrup.
  • Price: According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, fresh grapefruit costs $1.01 per pound on average. Juice is around $0.42 per cup on average. Grapefruit, particularly in season, can be economical.
  • Store: Store whole, fresh grapefruit in the refrigerator, unwashed. Storing at room temperature is an option too; be aware room temperature shortens its shelf life. Bottles of juice – once opened – should be refrigerated. Extra grapefruit from cans should be put into glass or plastic containers and refrigerated.
  • Prepare: Fresh grapefruit should be washed before cutting or peeling. Some like to cut grapefruit in half and scoop out the fruit. Others like to peel grapefruit like an orange and eat the sections.  Whatever you like to do, or as directed by your recipe.
  • Eat: Grapefruit is common as a fruit side or mixed into fruit salad. Try it over salad greens or this Grapefruit and Avocado Salad from Utah State University Extension.

  • Food-Drug Interaction: Compounds called furocoumarins in grapefruit and its juice may change how drugs work or are metabolized. Read the materials that come with your medications to check, or ask your pharmacist.

References:



Please share this article with your friends!
Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Pin on Pinterest

COMMENTS



Email will not display publicly, it is used only for validating comment