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Angie Peltier


Angie Peltier
Former Extension Educator, Commercial Agriculture



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Hill and Furrow

Current topics about crop production in Western Illinois, including field crops research at the NWIARDC in Monmouth.
Figure. Corn rootworm damage.

Free corn rootworm root ratings

Posted by Angie Peltier - Insects

Western corn rootworms have been a formidable agricultural pest, causing devastating yield losses historically. In 2003, corn hybrids expressing the transgenic Bt trait Cry3Bb1 were released for sale to the public. In 2011, several years and several additional individual and pyramided Bt traits later, populations of western corn rootworm resistant to Cry 3Bb1 were confirmed by...

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Figure. Japanese beetle; notice the iridescent metallic green head, the copper colored wings and the white tufts of hair along the sides and posterior. The tufts of hair or setae help in distinguishing the Japanese beetle from look alikes.
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Japanese beetles have emerged - now what?

Posted by Angie Peltier - Insects

Japanese beetle trapping. I work with personnel from the Illinois Natural History Survey to gauge insect population size and arrival either from out of state or emergence from the soil. This is accomplished through the use of pheromone traps . One insect that is of interest to corn and soybean producers in...

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Figure. Soybean aphid eggs are shiny and black and can be found near leaf buds on buckthorn plants (arrows) (Image: Michael Crossley).
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The soybean aphid: Many mysteries still remain

Posted by Angie Peltier - Insects

University of Wisconsin Entomology Professor Dr. Dave Hogg and an undergraduate student (Tom Olson) traveled to the Blackhawk Nature Preserve in Rock Island, Illinois to collect winged aphids for identification and genetic analysis ( Figure ).   What Researchers have Learned about the Soybean Aphid Life Cycle. The soybean aphid ( Aphis glycines...

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Figure. Foliar symptoms of sudden death syndrome and brown stem rot are very similar: yellowing and browning of the leaf tissue between the veins.  Plants suffering from brown stem rot often retain their leaves after death, while those suffering from SDS may lose their leaves but retain petioles.  The best the two diseases is to split open the stem length-wise. (Photo: Daren Mueller, Iowa State University,  Bugwood.org).

Is 2013 gearing up to be a bad year for sudden death syndrome in soybean?

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is caused by a fungus that survives in both plant residue and soil. Early planting and cool, wet soils during seed germination favor seedling infection. High pathogen populations can lead to root rot symptoms. Most often, however, infection goes undetected until much later in the growing season. The fungus resides in root tissue and produces toxins which c...

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Figure. Spray rig.(Image: Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, bugwood.com).

Are foliar fungicides recommended for V6 corn?

Posted by Angie Peltier - Disease

A group of scientists from ten states and Ontario, Canada work together as a 'Corn Disease Working Group' to collect disease and yield data from foliar fungicide trials. Foliar fungicides for vegetative corn (when corn has between four and six leaves) have been aggressively marketed in the past. In 2012, the Corn Disease Working Group collected data from experiments in which 10 different foliar...

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Figure. Soybean seedlings suffering from PPO-inhibitor herbicide injury.
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Herbicide injury in soybean

Very few soybean acres have been planted at the Northwestern Illinois Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center (NWIARDC) in 2013. For one soybean field that was planted on May 17 th , emergence on and around May 29 th coincided with heavy rain events. Unfortunately the emerging soybeans in this field began to develop severe symptoms soon after emergence. Symptoms were...

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Figure. Final planting date for corn in Illinois (Image: USDA-RMA).
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Prevented Planting and Federal Crop Insurance

The large rain events that occurred throughout western Illinois during May and the beginning of June has left many fields with standing water or saturated soil, leaving many intended corn acres unplanted. For those that purchased federal crop insurance the final date for planting corn was June 5th ( Figure ). The United States Department of Agriculture's Risk Management...

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